Point of Care Glucometers

HI,

My organization currently uses Roche Accu-Chek Inform II glucometers.  I am looking at the possibility of changing to a different glucometer once our contract ends.  Any recommendations?

Stacie

Replies to this Topic

If staff repeats a glucose within a few minutes of each other and the results are >20% apart, both results are held in Exceptions in Telcor.  We then contact that operator or manager to see which one (or both) should be charted.

Cindy Sorensen
Point of Care Laboratory
314-205-6100 x5656
Fax 314-205-6698
cindy.sorensen@stlukes-stl.com

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I'm curious to see if anyone else changed from Roche to Nova and what that experience was like.  We have had major issues with Roche since February and still no answer to our issues. 

What issues are you having with Roche since February?  We switched from Roche to Nova 18 months ago, its been great except the batteries for the Nova glucometer have an expiration date, and must be bought and replaced, something that we were not told of when we brought them on.

 

Anything used in a hospital has to have expiration date.

Glucose meters are considered medical devices so the batteries have expiration date .

The batteries only last 2 years, some may last just a bit  longer

but not more than the printed expiration date.

 

Timers and Thermometers usually have 2 year  valid calibration on them.

Something to check out.   

Generally speaking, it usually not possible for middleware (like Telcor) to be able to enact a delta failure because, unlike an LIS, there is no patient history based on patient ID held in the database.  I have asked Telcor if they would consider pursuing the addition of that functionality but no they have no plans to just yet.

 

I would caution anyone considering using their middleware to withhold one or more results from what are considered "repeat" scenarios (repeating test within a designated number of minutes).  Although you can assume that the second result is likely the one that was performed more carefully and is therefore more accurate, but you really don't know for certain.  Ultimately, you are withholding results from the chart that they had access to and may have used to treat.  It is one thing for the end user to strike the result at the point of care, but another to do it after the fact.  You may want to thoroughly vet the idea with both your medical director and nursing administration.  We are a large health system and we considered this option many years ago and decided against it.

Do you have a reference for the batteries to be used within the expiration dates?

Our Biomed department does not believe this applies to the  batteries.

We use AccuChek Inform II glucose meters.  The rechargable batteries have a date of manufacture, but no expiration date.

Back in November 2013 we received a recall notice from Nova Biomedical regarding the recall of batteries due to the labeling. Prior to August 2012, the batteries did not have an expiration date on the label (we started using these glucometers prior to this date I believe). I went around and discovered that that one battery had no expiration date. I also found that some of the batteries had started to swell-their expiration dates had been exceeded. One battery was actually pushing on the door of the battery compartment. When I did monthly checks, I only thought of the controls and strips. This was on eye opener to say the least.

Nova provided a Brain Shark link providing information on battery safety: http://brainshark.com/novabio/battery1

I think that most inspectors will cite any out of date items-including batteries if they go as far as to open the meter's battery door. Out of date batteries also pose a safety hazard.

Everything must be discarded or replaced if it has an expiration date. I was responding to the November 8th post by Pet Maniquis where she states that: anything used in a hospital has to have an expiration date.  Our glucose meter batteries do not have a stated expiration date.

When we first got our NOVA meters in 2009, the batteries did  not have expiration date. They also got  puffy.  They did  not explode but they can cause fire ( like a cell phone) since they are lithium batteries.  After 2 years, they solved the problem and we do not have the "puffy battery" problem anymore.  

 I called NOVA today  to clarify why they have expiration date on the batteries and did not have them before. I was told that FDA mandated them to  have expiration date on their batteries. They did not send out a memo or bulletin about batteries but just like Debra Howard said, I would not use expired batteries because they may pose some safety hazard.

I think it was our Biomed who told me that we cannot use batteries pass their  expiration dates because of our Safety policy  on medical equipment.

I also do not want the inspector to cite me on using expired batteries.

 

When we first got our NOVA meters in 2009, the batteries did  not have expiration date. They also got  puffy.  They did  not explode but they can cause fire ( like a cell phone) since they are lithium batteries.  After 2 years, they solved the problem and we do not have the "puffy battery" problem anymore.  

 I called NOVA today  to clarify why they have expiration date on the batteries and did not have them before. I was told that FDA mandated them to  have expiration date on their batteries. They did not send out a memo or bulletin about batteries but just like Debra Howard said, I would not use expired batteries because they may pose some safety hazard.

I think it was our Biomed who told me that we cannot use batteries pass their  expiration dates because of our Safety policy  on medical equipment.

I also do not want the inspector to cite me on using expired batteries.

 

When we first got our NOVA meters in 2009, the batteries did  not have expiration date. They also got  puffy.  They did  not explode but they can cause fire ( like a cell phone) since they are lithium batteries.  After 2 years, they solved the problem and we do not have the "puffy battery" problem anymore.  

 I called NOVA today  to clarify why they have expiration date on the batteries and did not have them before. I was told that FDA mandated them to  have expiration date on their batteries. They did not send out a memo or bulletin about batteries but just like Debra Howard said, I would not use expired batteries because they may pose some safety hazard.

I think it was our Biomed who told me that we cannot use batteries pass their  expiration dates because of our Safety policy  on medical equipment.

I also do not want the inspector to cite me on using expired batteries.

 

We also use the Nova Glucose meters and experienced the same issue with "expanding" batteries that were beyond their expiration date. We didn't realize they had expiration dates until we had this issue. We also noticed that when they go beyond their expiration dates the meters may present with different functionality issues. So we definitely started monitoring this for that purpose. It's an extra expense (roughly every 2 years)that NOVA doesn't tell you about upfront, so if you're looking to move to the NOVA meters keep that in mind to include replacement batteries in your contract. As far as inspections go, my feeling is that if a CAP inspector is aware of this sort of thing and discovers expired batteries in a meter, they could cite you under COM.30525-Maintenance and Function Checks.

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